Who benefits from mobile voting?

While the pandemic has highlighted the desperate need for better remote voting options in the United States and other parts of the world, for many groups this lack of options is not a new concern. Voters with disabilities, overseas military personnel, Native Americans, and so many others lack equal access to the ballot during every single election – COVID-19 has only exacerbated an existing problem. Offering well-tested alternatives to traditional in-person and mail-in voting methods serves only to make our elections more equal and fair.

Bottom line: All citizens deserve access to a safe, secure, and accessible method of voting remotely – mobile voting can help us get there. 

To experience a full download of this graphic—with detailed explanations of how each demographic can benefit from mobile voting – click the button below.

Michigan Democratic Party Completes Successful Virtual Convention with the Help of Mobile Voting App Voatz


BOSTON and LANSING, Mich., Sept. 2, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Voatz, the Boston-based mobile voting platform, today announced the successful completion of a first-of-its-kind virtual convention with the Michigan Democratic Party. This year’s convention was the first to virtually nominate candidates for the state Supreme Court, among other elected positions, for the November ballot.

Forced to participate from their homes because of the COVID-19 pandemic, nearly 2,000 delegates both submitted signature nominations and voted for their preferred candidates on the mobile app downloaded to their smartphones. Besides the Michigan Supreme Court, candidates were nominated to the state Board of Education and boards at the University of Michigan, Michigan State University and Wayne State University. Roughly 91 percent of 2,092 credentialed delegates participated. 

This milestone marks the fourth convention that the Michigan Democratic Party has completed in collaboration with Voatz, with the prior three conventions occurring on-site in Lansing and Detroit and using the Voatz tablet voting system. This prior collaboration contributed to a smooth transition to an all-virtual convention for the party without disruption, and marks yet another compelling case for the benefit of piloting technology options that make elections resilient. 

“There were so many unique challenges with this year’s convention because of the pandemic, but the Voatz platform eased many of our concerns,” said Christy Jensen, Executive Director of the Michigan Democratic Party. “Voatz enabled our delegates to be verified remotely and participate through their smartphones. The convenience, safety and accessibility of voting this way was eye-opening for everyone who participated.”

Voatz’s staff worked closely with the party to ensure voter education, training, and a smooth rollout of the platform for all users. The platform was also built in cooperation with disability rights advocates, including accommodations for the visually impaired. Those who did not use the Voatz app had access to voting through a help desk. 

“We’ve always enjoyed working with the Michigan Democratic Party and this time, are proud to have helped them with their first-ever virtual convention,” said Voatz Co-Founder and CEO Nimit Sawhney. “These are such uncertain times in so many regards, including voting, and we wanted to ensure a seamless remote experience. We’re happy to have seen such positive turnout from thousands of voters, who were able to cast their votes safely and securely.”

About Voatz
Voatz is an award-winning mobile elections platform that leverages cutting-edge technology (including biometrics and a blockchain-based infrastructure) to increase access and security in elections. Since 2016 Voatz has run 70 elections with cities, universities, towns, nonprofits, and both major state political parties for convention voting. Learn more here.

About the Michigan Democratic Party
The Michigan Democratic Party fights for families, seniors, students and veterans, and works to elect Democrats across the state while holding Republicans accountable across the board.

Beyond the Pandemic: Has Voting Changed Forever?

Below is a transcription of a recent webinar involving a panel discussion moderated by Chris Stern (The Information), with presence from Amelia Powers-Gardner (Utah County Clerk), Emily Frye (MITRE Corp), Asia LaBrie (Haven Life Insurance), and Nimit Sawhney (Voatz).

The transcription has been repurposed with permission from the Chamber of Digital Commerce and has been lightly edited for clarity.

View full panel discussion here.

Perianne Boring: Our next session is moderated by Chris Stern. He is a reporter at The Information. Is COVID going to be the catalyst to change? We’ve been living amongst a really historic moment throughout COVID-19, and it’s really impacted so many conversations we’re having on the national and international stage. And will that be an opportunity to move the dialogue forward when we talk about voting and voting technology?

Our next session, we have an elections official, cybersecurity experts, voting technology experts from both the public and the private sector. Chris, thank you so much for leading this discussion, over to you.

Chris Stern: Thanks. Hi everybody, I’m glad to be here, and I think that that’s a great introduction. I wrote a story a little while ago saying, “Hey, we’re in this COVID crisis.” It was very early. It was March. If we can’t figure out e-voting now, when will we be able to do that? In order to discuss that and maybe go over a couple of the points that we heard about in the last 30 minutes, we have Amelia Powers-Gardner, Nimit Sawhney, Amelia Frye and Asia LaBrie. I’ll go through them. 

Amelia Powers-Gardner is at the heart of voting in the United States. She’s county clerk in Utah. She’s a former engineer and manager at Caterpillar, as well. Now she’s the county clerk. She was elected in 2018. And during her year in office, she’s pushed through a lot of election-related reforms. She piloted a mobile voting app that was powered by blockchain, and she also allows her voters to vote by mail.

Nimit Sawhney is the co-founder and CEO of Voatz. It’s a platform that allows e-voting, so we’re going to want to hear a lot about his point of view. They’ve run more than 67 elections at the state and county level, including the first mobile voting election in 2018 in West Virginia.

Emily Frye is the director of cyber integration at MITRE Public Sector. She practiced law, and she worked with a startup through several rounds of funding. Her expertise includes critical infrastructure, national resilience and economic impact of cybersecurity. 

Asia LaBrie is the head of information security at Haven Life Insurance Company. She’s a former VP at Goldman Sachs, also at Citigroup. She also spent some time at Citigroup where she led a team responsible for interbroker dealer connectivity and algorithmic trading. 

I want to get right into it with Amelia Powers-Gardner. You’re really at the center of how folks vote. You’re the valve that pushes votes one way or another in terms of how people can have access to democracy. Can you describe your experience with online voting, and why did you take that route?

Amelia Powers-Gardner: Yeah, absolutely. Thank you for having me, and I’m excited to be here to talk about the future of voting. I’ve had the opportunity to really be a pioneer in this space and push things that some of the other people in my profession, county clerks from across the nation, have hesitated to do. I was put in office, to an office, that was literally called the epicenter of dysfunction by our governor. I was elected by a large majority because it was such a mess, which gave me a lot of freedom, because no matter what I did, it was going to be better than what they had before. So this gave me the opportunity to be a pioneer, and no matter what I did, it was going to be better. The reason we went with mobile voting is when I started looking at our overseas and military and our disabled population, the methods that they were given were unreliable.

They were given vote by mail, which we utilize for our domestic population, but when you start dealing with an overseas population, vote by mail becomes a lot more sporadic and really unreliable. The other option they were given was email. And when they utilized email, not only was it absolutely not secure, but it waived their right to a secret ballot. 

So now, we’ve got our military men and women serving us overseas, and they’ve got two options. One is unreliable and the other doesn’t afford them a secret ballot. So I really looked at the mobile voting as a way to provide our overseas and military citizens, particularly those serving in the military, this opportunity to vote for the freedoms that they’re preserving. Also in the disabled community, some of them can’t hold a pencil and vote by mail wasn’t working for them. So this really gave them the opportunity to cast their vote and to do so independently and with integrity. It was really a no-brainer for me.

Chris Stern: Can you describe a little bit about how you got to trust a particular e-voting system and how you became comfortable with it, that it would work and that it was safe for your voters?

Amelia Powers-Gardner: Yeah. So when I looked at those systems, what I was comparing them to was our current system. So what I really looked for was do you have better ways of identifying the voter to ensure that it’s really the voter casting that vote, and do you have more secure ways for them to transmit that vote than what we currently had? We looked at several different options, and I myself am a fan of blockchain. I’ve been interested in blockchain for years, and all things blockchain, whether cryptocurrency or utilized for the immutable ledger. 

And so, as I evaluated different products, I was naturally drawn to the blockchain product. I actually met Nimit. Nimit made an appointment with me, I think, my first week in office and came and showed me his solution. It checked all those boxes, more secure than we currently have, more reliable, [and] gave the people the opportunity to cast a vote anonymously and with integrity. And it utilized blockchain, which made me feel more secure knowing that we had an immutable ledger that I could audit against in the future to ensure that these votes really were being counted as they were cast.

Chris Stern: Did you audit?

Amelia Powers-Gardner: We did. We have done four pilots now. We did the municipal, primary municipal general, presidential election and the nominating primary here in Utah this year. And we have audited every one of those elections. Every one of those, we’ve had 100% clean 

Chris Stern: And how does that compare to say a mail-in or a rather physical voting, in-person voting in terms of a sense of security with it.

Amelia Powers-Gardner: So for mail-in voting and for personal voting, we typically will audit about 1% of those votes. With electronic voting, we’ve been able to audit 100% of those votes. Risk-limiting audits are very common in the election world. It’s something that we, as election officials, utilize to ensure that our vote is true and secure, and typically it’s a percentage of those votes. We’ve been fortunate with these electronic pilots to be able to audit 100% of those votes and give us that much more confidence in the results of those elections.

Chris Stern: Okay, I want to get back to you maybe a little bit later to talk about [how] those audits work, but Nimit, let me ask you. Could you briefly describe Voatz and what you all are trying to do and what the status is of the electronic-voting industry generally right now?

Nimit Sawhney: So [to] the first part of your question about Voatz, we are the youngest elections company in the country. And our focus from the very beginning has been on mobility, particularly focused on utilizing all the advantages which our smartphone-based ecosystem provides. We led that space of letting users use their technology, get remotely verified by scanning a government-issued ID, taking a selfie and then using the biometric security features, the trusted secure element-based features on the device to be able to submit a ballot, including if needed, signing on the screen. So we-

Chris Stern: Let me just be clear. You’re talking about people’s personal mobile device, right? You’re not talking about some device that is in a room somewhere. Just describe the process from start to finish about how one comes to end up voting over your Voatz system.

Nimit Sawhney: Correct. So this is personal devices. The process is very similar to other forms of absentee voting. Just like you would register for absentee voting by mail, instead of using mail, if you’re eligible for electronic option, and you decide to choose it, then you mark that in your application. Your county, your local election clerk, would have read that. 

Once they approve you, you then get an invitation to download the smartphone application on your iPhone or compatible Android device. You start with an email or a mobile number. And then, once you’ve passed initial onboarding, the system prompts you for an ID check. So you need to take a picture of a government-issued photo ID. You can use a driver’s license, state ID or US passport. If you don’t have any of those, you can use other forms of IDs, as well. And then, you take a live selfie, and what it does is firstly make sure that you are a real person. You’re not taking a video of another video or a video of another picture, and it matches your face to the picture on your ID, makes sure your ID’s valid, and it’s not fraudulent, and then matches the data on your ID with the data on the voter registration file for that election. 

And once all those checks pass, which takes about a minute, then your identity’s digitized, stored in the secure element on your phone, locked with the help of a biometric credential. It could be a fingerprint, a face ID or a variable. And then, all the documents you’ve uploaded are deleted. At this point, you are ready to receive the ballot. You get your mobile ballot, which is essentially the same you would get if you ordered by mail or if you went to the precinct to do it in person. You mark the ovals. And when you’re ready to submit, you may be asked to sign an affidavit, depending on your jurisdiction. Once you do that, you submit. 

You get a receipt. You can verify your choices were recorded correctly. And then, in the background, an anonymous receipt is also sent to the jurisdiction. On Election Day, a paper ballot is printed. Also, every oval in the background has been recorded on a blockchain-based infrastructure. Once the paper ballot’s printed, it has the ability to do an audit with the anonymous receipt, the paper ballot and the data on the blockchain. So end to end, that’s how the whole process works.

Chris Stern: Okay, great. Well, now that we’ve heard that explanation, let me ask Emily. Is that a safe system? Are you comfortable with that? Can we trust the phone? Can we trust the network? Can we trust all of the elements that make this into a voting system that democracy can trust?

Emily Frye: That’s a great question. Rather than talk about any particular system, I think what’s important to note is that regardless of how good any particular system is, and we have several nice candidates in this space now, we still are dealing with two obstacles for all of these vendors. So what we really need to do is find a way forward for all of these vendors through two particular obstacles. 

The first obstacle is that there’s a time-honored tradition of feeling like I carry my ballot, and I cast my vote in a personal way at a specific location. And there’s a weight of tradition that we carry as baggage. Now in other contexts, I might not call that baggage. I would call it an honored tradition, and the reason that I think it’s becoming more like baggage is that we’re dealing right now with a digital generation. These are people who they’ve grown up holding their whole lives on these devices, and they expect to be able to conduct all functions, including functions of dealing with the state, on digital devices. And so, we’re dealing with an influx now of a community that views that burden of taking time off of work and going to cast your ballot in person as actually something they want no part of. And so, within the next few years as that digital generation starts to [enter]  voting age, we actually need to find ways where the tradition of voting is just as honorable and just as noted and just as worthy on a digital device as it is in person. 

So what does that transition look like? We’re dealing with some burdens of tradition, and the second major issue is, regardless of what I think, regardless of what Secretary Warner thinks and what regardless of what you think, Chris, the fact of the matter is we don’t have adequate standards. So let’s say that some independent person who’s very well trusted in the system asserts, “I believe in these three companies as great offers.” Okay, well, what standards are you relying on to make that assertion? We’re missing some standards here. It would reassure the entire ecosystem, if we had some standards that addressed the basic baselines of here’s your hygiene protocols. Here are the special standards that apply due to the need to return a ballot digitally. Here’s the authentication body of standards that we’re using for each individual in this chain, and here’s our chain-of-custody standard or some body of standards that we could then say to the vendors, “Here are three standards. Have you met the three standards?” And it would reassure our election officials around the country as they seek to move in this very logical direction.

Chris Stern: That’s a great point. I mean, the standards is not something that exists now at all. Amelia, I’m going to jump back to you before I get to Asia. Amelia, if there was a standard, if there was a regulation of some kind that covered it, I have two questions. One is what would you see in those standards? And two, and maybe this is something we should talk more broadly, is it appropriate to set that standard at the state level, or do you want to see it set at the federal level?

Amelia Powers-Gardner: Those are great questions. I have to agree wholeheartedly. I really think the industry needs some standards. We keep hearing it can’t be done, and that’s just frankly not true. In an age where we can edit DNA using technology, we can also find out how to vote securely using technology. We just need some standards like Emily said. I couldn’t agree more with that. 

I think number one, we need security standards so that we can say, “These are the minimum standards that you need to transmit a ballot.” We also need identity or authentication standards. As an election official, I’m responsible for ensuring that the actual voter is the one casting that vote. So if we could have some identity standards, some security standards and then basic standards around the election process. Was this an anonymous vote, and was it cast in a timely manner? Was there only one vote cast? Just very simple things that I don’t think would be very difficult to comply with, just having them in a standard would be great. 

As far as those standards go, the way things work right now, there aren’t really standards on a state level, but there’s certification on a state level. Typically what you would want is an industry standard or a national standard that is recognized by the industry and that different states can then therefore adopt for certification of an election vendor.

Chris Stern: Okay, thanks. Asia, we’re getting into the discussion of standard and, in effect, regulation. How close does that get us to the end goal of folks feeling safe with e-voting? And when I say folks, I mean government officials. I mean people like Amelia, and I mean citizens like all of us. How much does regulation get us towards that goal?

Asia LaBrie: I think that it is contagious, right? If you can get a group of a population comfortable, that population can teach maybe their children or their grandparents to then also get comfortable. That’s not the best example of contagious, but I think there’s a lot of education and training that will need to happen. It can happen organically, and the standards are probably the first step. 

I do want to also highlight there’s another element to this conversation that I think is important, and that is the operational risk. It’s not just the attacker side or the fraud side, but how do we run elections and do that in a resilient manner? I think that’s something we’re about to see happen this year with mail-in voting, with the numbers increasing – something that electronic voting would be a solution for going forward. I just want to raise that; I think an important problem that we really need to solve.

Chris Stern: I mean, Nimit, I’ve read and I’ve talked to people who say, “As soon as a vote touches the internet, as soon as someone’s electoral preference is subject to hacking, it can never be safe and we can’t trust it.” What is your response to that? What is your response to the internet just is inherently untrustworthy, and there’s nothing we can do to fix that?

Nimit Sawhney: When people make those broad statements, I think they miss a few things. For example, the internet by itself was not essentially designed for security. The internet, it’s like a highway. It’s a mechanism to transport things. Security in this scenario is the responsibility of the application. You can’t really keep blaming the transport and say because the transport didn’t have X, Y, Z, we can’t even build something secure on it. It would be very disingenuous to say that. 

I think as some of the other panelists have mentioned, there are so many use cases where secure transport is happening because the applications that  are enrolled there, whether it be space or defense or healthcare or finance. They’ve figured out a way to transmit data securely and in a manner which is immutable. 

And so, for sure, we can do that in the election space. It’s harder, because not only do you have to transmit it securely, you also have to make sure that the identity of the voter cannot be reverse-engineered. Applications exist with infrastructure like distributed ledger-based systems. I mean, even before blockchain became popular, there have been scientific projects on immutability. You just can’t claim that just because the internet doesn’t provide that secure fundamental, just because it’s a highway, that you can’t run a secure application on it. I think we have so many examples out there. 

Secondly, along with that, we also hear a constant companion statement that because it’s all software, you can’t trust software. That also seems a little bit farfetched. Granted software can have bugs, but we also have what’s called a formal software verification process, which is used by the Department of Defense. It is used in the space industry. It’s used in fight software. It’s added to fighter jets automated systems. And so, that same model is very applicable to software in any other industry. Why not in elections? 

I think that the technology to do this is here.To make sure that we can transmit something securely and make sure it’s not tampered with, either during transportation or when it’s at rest, and more importantly, the ability to audit the whole thing. Like Amelia was saying, if you do it at scale, it would not be timely, possible, to audit 200 million votes, if everybody voted electronically. But if you can do a subset and get that mathematical assurance, just like what happens with paper ballots, then you can come to a very strong conclusion that the whole digital process is secure and tamper-resistant.

Chris Stern: There’s a lot more voters than there are fighter jets. When you talk about going to scale, I think that’s the big issue. And there’s been great examples of what Amelia’s done in her state and what others have done in Washington and Colorado, but I guess the question is:Yes, you can be successful at the West Virginia level where you’re getting votes from a few hundred army or military folks overseas or folks with disabilities, but what about a vision of ramping this up to tens, even hundreds of millions of people who vote in this country? It seems like that creates the attention of a national election that is very attractive to hackers. Can we  ramp this up to scale? It seems the scale is the problem.

Nimit Sawhney: No, that’s a great question. I think ramping up clearly can’t happen overnight, and so we have to do what we call baby steps. So like you rightly mentioned, we started with hundreds of voters. Next step is to take it to the next level, use thousands of voters and then involve other partners in the ecosystem. Right now, as transactions are happening on mobile devices, mobile carriers are not involved in the election, securing the election process. The next really good opportunity would be to involve major election carriers to make sure that when this scales up, like you said, tens of and eventually hundreds of millions of people, they are the edge infrastructure. They are the ones who are going to get attacked, the ISPs, the edge routers. 

At that stage, you’re looking at the national infrastructure. You’re looking at a national conversation, and it’s no longer sufficient to say that a specific county or a specific state can defend its system. That becomes a national endeavor, and countries have managed to do that. 

Estonia is a really good example where despite daily attacks, daily threats, they’ve run secure online elections for 10 years. Granted, they are a small country, but they have more than a million people voting, and they’ve managed to do it. Clearly there’s a way to secure the infrastructure. Our government services are all going electronic. Look at Singapore, Dubai, UAE. Just like we would secure that infrastructure, we can secure the e-voting infrastructure as well, but it has to be done one step at a time and eventually we will get there.

Chris Stern: Asia and Emily, how do you feel about that? Yes, in concept, we need e-voting. Yes, in concept, it is something that provides a very elegant solution to a lot of problems we have, whether it’s fear of gathering in an election place to vote side by side with other people. How close are we to ramping it up from small scale to the large scale that allows for the typical two-year and four-year cycle in the United States? Emily, why don’t you take this first?

Emily Frye: So recently, I learned that the most northwesterly province of Canada, just as a wholesale matter, decided to go with e-voting for federal elections. So to me, it says the driver is necessity. For them, the driver was necessity. The people felt that it was hard, physically hard to get to the polling places. It was not a COVID issue. This was last fall and they just were ready, and they had a need, and they saw the technology. They looked over the different security aspects. Even though there are no standards and the Elections Board of Canada was a little taken aback, this particular province went right ahead. 

I do think we’re looking at a number of years, and I think the drivers are a combination of necessity to ensure voter turnout, a necessity to make available the ability to vote when you are posted on a hillside in Afghanistan and you don’t have access to first-class mail, when you are a disabled person in this country and that is increasingly a more visible problem. 

We’re seeing some good press about people who have genuine needs, who have disabilities and can’t get out. Now, this year we’re in a unique spot. We’re at this pain point of people feeling genuine fear. It’s no longer a question of a few isolated populations with special needs. All of us have that fear, right? And is this a moment that can catalyze many, many years of slow growth into a shorter period of, oh, focused, “Let’s get these standards done. Let’s meet those standards. Let’s make sure everyone’s comfortable.” And then, you have a bunch of states who actually want it and those things [are] coming together a little faster. 

My hope would be that we would be able to speak specifically about progress toward establishing a baseline for security standards, identity standards and knowing who’s meeting those before the next four-year cycle. Sometimes I’m overly optimistic, but that would be my hope.

Chris Stern: Asia, your thoughts on this and on how close we are? What are the steps we need to take to find broad acceptability of e-voting?

Asia LaBrie: I think Emily’s spot on with the drivers behind moving mobile voting forward more quickly. I mean with COVID, I think we’re seeing a lot of new technology advances in areas that maybe we wouldn’t have expected, like weddings and boating licenses. You see technology being much more palatable. I get asked by friends and family quite often, “Why can’t we vote online?”, from a technology problem specific point of view. 

And I don’t see the roadblock, other than training, education and then the tough, hard problem of implementing and rolling it out.I hope by the next election, sorry, there’s elections every single year, but by the next presidential election, I hope that we have at least one large city piloting mobile voting. That is something I’m advocating and passionate about.

Chris Stern: Amelia, can you describe what e-voting was like from your constituents’ point of view, from the consumer point of view? Was there one group that was more comfortable with it, and was there any groups that had difficulty figuring out how to do it?

Amelia Powers-Gardner: Yeah, absolutely. So we sent surveys to every single person who utilized the vote. Now once again, this is a very small demographic, but we sent surveys to every person who utilized the mobile voting and we didn’t find any major demographic. We have older couples that are serving service missions in other countries in their 60s and 70s, and they were able to figure it out and do it. We have military members that are just barely 18 and eligible to vote serving in the military that were able to do it. We didn’t have any major group. 

There may have been some that needed a little bit of help with scanning their ID and doing the selfie, but when it came time to actually cast their votes, they didn’t have a problem with it and they really liked it. In fact, right now we are getting phone calls from military members and service missionaries from other counties in our state, calling us and saying, “Hey, my partner over here, they get to vote on their phone. Why don’t I?” And I have to explain to them, “That’s because your county isn’t doing the mobile voting.” And the question isn’t, “Is this safe?” The question is, “Well, why aren’t they? Why aren’t they doing this mobile voting?” So from the user standpoint, it’s significantly easier. They like it. They don’t see a problem with it. 

We actually have a higher voter turnout with those that are eligible to use mobile voting. We have a higher voter turnout for our overseas citizens in municipal city elections, if they can use their phone, than we do from our domestic population who lives here and can either vote by mail or show up at the polls. We’re a vote-by-mail county, so we mail every eligible voter who is an active voter. We mail them a ballot, and we have a higher percentage of people voting on their phone from overseas than we do from people right here in our county who we mail a ballot to.

Chris Stern: Do you have any data on what voter participation was in year-over-year folks who voted via their phones versus voted [at] physical [polls] or a mail-in ballot of some kind?

Amelia Powers-Gardner: Yeah, it was significant. We had significantly higher participation of those overseas. I’m just comparing overseas to overseas, try to be apples to apples, but overseas voters casting their vote by mail or email as opposed to the electronic voting — it’s significantly higher. So for example, in the last major municipal election, our voter turnout for the county was about 35%. Our voter turnout for our overseas citizens that could use their phone was about 45%. Previously, theirs was about 11%, huge, huge increase in voter turnout for that population.

I do know that the younger generations feel more comfortable with voting by their phone. We have a city here in our county that is predominantly a millennial city, brand-new housing, high-density housing near a university. It’s just predominantly millennial. They have a higher participation in social media polls, than they do that vote in their city election, and that city has asked me many times, “Can we please use mobile voting for our municipal elections, because we’d have a higher voter percentage turnout.” The only thing that stops me from doing that is the lack of standards and, therefore, a lack of state certification so that I can let them. Otherwise, this community, I would absolutely let them vote on their phones.

Chris Stern: I’m confused. Why are you allowed to do it in other cases, but you can’t let this community do it?

Amelia Powers-Gardner: So the rules are a little bit different when it comes to overseas and military voters, and disabled voters. Overseas and military, the federal government requires us, all 50 states are required, to provide a ballot electronically to overseas and military citizens. 29 states require that we let them return those ballots electronically, so a mobile app works in that case, and it doesn’t take the same certification as a broad usage.

Chris Stern: Emily, we hear a lot about, during the last few minutes about, millennials are much more comfortable with this. They’re more comfortable with online surveys. They’re more comfortable with social media in general, and maybe they see voting as an extension of social media rather than a fundamental building block of democracy, but I also hear in different contexts about other things I write about, things like TikTok, where there’s a lot of concern that the younger generation is very free and easy with their personal information, and that other countries can take advantage of it, because they offer it up so freely and in such a insecure environment that it opens up the US to manipulation, not just at the personal hacking level but also influencing elections and things like that. 

So what is your reaction to that? Is there a creeping lack of a sense that data isn’t as important as it actually is? The young folks may not appreciate how important their privacy is, but there are folks over in the Pentagon and the CIA and others who are very concerned about it, because they see it as an opportunity to open the door and manipulate our society and our culture and our politics.

Emily Frye: So here you go down this path that unpacks some other very, very important issues. I would like to pause it, for purposes of this conversation and consideration that we are facing two co-equal threats as a nation to democracy, when it comes to the elections portion of democracy. If we can all agree that elections are a fundamental underpinning of constitutional democracy, that means they must have integrity. In order to have integrity, it means both the actual technical details of the process must themselves have integrity and be trustworthy. 

It also means that the ecosystem and the ethos around the perceived integrity of the elections technology and process themselves, are trustworthy. So when we think about the threats to that, we see a cybersecurity threat. Co-equal to that, we see a misinformation or disinformation threat. Both of these are important threats, and unfortunately they exacerbate one another. And yet, they can be dealt with in separate ways. 

What we are primarily dealing with during this conversation is actually the cybersecurity issues. We are facing simply a lack of standards for cybersecurity when it comes to this particular marketplace. At the same time, we are also facing a body of problems related to mis- and disinformation. I actually want to separate those in this case, because I don’t want to burden a burgeoning, promising, technologically helpful offering with the freight and baggage of something that we’ve got to find other tools for. 

So let me just start by saying there’s a very big difference between TikTok and casting a vote in a federal election, right? So I don’t really need any credentials to participate with Instagram, Snapchat, TikTok, Facebook, I can make up an awful lot of stuff, and to me social media is an ecosystem that is essentially designed to be manipulated. What we need to do when it comes to both how we architect, and how we speak about mobile and digital and remote voting systems, is to be the opposite of that, to be an ecosystem that is designed to be heavily authenticated and trustworthy. 

So we’re dealing with different tiers of a digital ecosystem, and we have to be clear which tier we’re dealing with when it comes to the mobile and remote voting systems. That is a special place right up there with critical infrastructure operations, right? We have very different standards when it comes to financial services, to running the electricity grid, to operating elections than we would for simply engaging in social chit-chat on TikTok, Facebook, Snapchat, Reddit. And we do need to be quite clear about that.

Chris Stern: Yeah, I hear you, but I also hear folks saying, “Well, the younger generation’s comfortable with e-voting. Therefore, we should go forward with e-voting.” And I wonder if we’re skipping a step there.

Amelia Powers-Gardner: I think there is something we need to add to that. Keep in mind that a vote not cast changes the outcome of an election just as much as a vote that’s been changed. And when we are disenfranchising large groups of eligible voters, we are changing an election. 

If the people with disabilities voted at the same rate as people without disabilities in this country, we’d have seven million more voters every election. Think about that. That means that people with disabilities are not being represented. 

We no longer live in an era where only white male property owners get to vote. We live in a country where every eligible voter, regardless of their socioeconomic status, their gender or the color of their skin gets to vote. And if we are using an antiquated system that leaves out single moms or people in inner cities or people with disabilities or people under the age of 30, then we are changing the elections by doing that. No, we absolutely cannot compromise integrity, and we cannot compromise security. That’s not an option. 

Like Emily said, this is critical infrastructure. I had the Department of Homeland Security in my office for eight hours yesterday going through our systems step-by-step. It was like a 437-point inspection to make sure that we are secure. We can’t compromise that, but we also need to realize that we have large swaths of people that traditionally have been disenfranchised, including our men and women in uniform overseas fighting for freedom. They’ve been disenfranchised for the last 50 to 100 years, and that’s just frankly not acceptable. So we have to move forward with integrity, but also realizing that a vote not cast changes the outcome of an election as much as a vote changed.

Chris Stern: Nimit, you are caught between a rock and a hard place, because on the other side, you have these millennials that I’ve accused of being free and easy with their data. On the other side, you have the folks over at MIT who seem to think it’s impossible for you to produce a secure voting system and actually derailed an election that you were about to run. West Virginia changed courses midstream because of questions that MIT raised. Are you fearful that the bar will continue to be raised because of the culture on the other side with cybersecurity experts who are fearful of anything that touches the internet being insecure, or do you think that that’s a problem where you can make them comfortable with it?

Nimit Sawhney: Yeah, yeah. In some sense, we have seen the arguments evolve. Two years ago when we were doing our first pilot, the arguments were, “How will you audit? Where’s the paper trail? How does the voter know that their intent was honored?” And so, when we were able to address those questions, now there’s a new set of questions. 

I think in some sense, the bar does keep rising, but we were the first in this space, and so, we’re not shying away from that, I think that that’s good that there is scrutiny and criticism. Some of it would be more objective and less deceptive, but I think scrutiny is good. It keeps us on our toes and also hopefully puts us on a path to more objective deliberation where we’re not speaking in echo chambers. 

I think sometimes we feel like a lot of the security conversation happens in an echo chamber, and it doesn’t really take into account all the things which Amelia just mentioned or what Emily just mentioned. And so, our biggest hope is that by doing these pilots and pushing the ball forward, however slow and painful that may be, that we get to a place where we at least can have a conversation and say, “Look, before you dismiss something, have a look. There may be different ways to do this,” but if we can all come together, like Amelia said to edit DNA, to send people to the moon, bring back the space shuttles and formally verify software so it cannot be tampered with or hacked, for sure we can come up with a common set of standards like was proposed earlier and use that as a basis to move forward. So I agree with you that there are lots of hurdles, and the bar keeps rising, but I think we’re not perfect. And so, we look to that as inspiration to improve and keep waiting. 

And so far, I think we’ve been fortunate enough to have an opportunity to do that, do more and more of these pilots. With each pilot, we learn so much. We recently released some security data, which to the best of our knowledge, no elections company anyone has ever managed to release. So hopefully, these are baby steps which make the conversation more constructive, and we love feedback. Hopefully it’s more constructive and less destructive like in the past.

Chris Stern: Asia, you said that one of the concerns you had was understanding better the operational aspects of e-voting or at least that that’s an area of focus, and I was just thinking about that. And I was wondering because at the end of the day, this comes to the nuts and bolts of how this will work, and I was wondering if you had any thoughts about what it is that you would like to see.

Asia LaBrie: Yeah, sorry. And I meant that for all of voting over time, not just e-voting.

Chris Stern: You said it at the time. I understand that now, as well.

Asia LaBrie: I just would like to comment a little bit on what Nimit just said around the research I think as far as standards and guidelines go, that they should apply also to the research that’s being done. It seems to be a little bit lopsided, and we’re looking more on how to break things and not how to solve things. And it would be great to have universities looking at building innovation and solving problems, not just breaking them. And it’s something I think we as a country need to improve on. I’ve read the MIT paper in great detail. There’s a few things that I would challenge, but one of the points that are missed in there is a risk assessment on current practices versus what is new, the new solution. It’s easy to look at this one solution I guess in a bucket and not look at the holistic strategy of where we’re headed as a country. I’m sorry. I forgot your first question.

Chris Stern: You mentioned operational issues that needed to be addressed.

Asia LaBrie: Yeah, I love technology. I am very passionate about it, listened to a whole bunch of DEFCON talks this weekend. I’m very tired. There was a lot of talk around standards, guidelines, some great conversation around that. There was great conversation around vulnerability, disclosure and improving that space, which I was glad to hear. And there was a really great talk too around how are we able to handle the operational aspect of mail-in voting this year. It may take time to count these votes. The people are going to need to be more patient, asking the hacker community to please don’t disclose vulnerabilities the day before an election, right? So-

Chris Stern: Good luck with that.

Asia LaBrie: Yes, that’s where I was headed with that.

Chris Stern: Okay. Amelia, can you tell us? I mean, you’re in a unique position. Do you see strengths and weaknesses? Could you walk us through the… I guess I’m counting three different ways to vote now, which is mail-in, e-voting and in person.

Amelia Powers-Gardner: Yeah, absolutely. In fact, we do all three, right? So I think I’m one of only maybe three jurisdictions in the country that actually does in-person, mail-in and e-voting. And Asia nailed it. Like her, I went through that MIT paper with a fine-tooth comb, right? I went through that with a fine-tooth comb. 

I was faced with a decision similar to Secretary Warner where I had people that were threatening me with bad publicity, if I continued to use the Voatz platform. And as I went through that, and actually it was on a phone call with these researchers with MIT, the Department of Homeland Security facilitated a phone call with us and these researchers. And I asked them several probing questions about how we currently run elections. They had no clue about how we actually run elections today. 

There was a handful of things in their paper that I wholeheartedly could just push aside, because it was no different than how we run things today. Now do we run elections perfectly today? No. Is there a perfect way to run elections? No. Has there been voter fraud and voter-election prosecution for in-person voting? Yes. Has there been in-person voting with machines? Yes. Has there been fraud with in-person voting with paper? Yes. Has there been fraud with mail-in voting? Yes. 

I mean, what we’re doing now is not perfect, but it’s the best that we can do. And when we look at evaluating things, we need to look at, number one, let’s evaluate it compared to what we’re currently doing. Number two, how secure is it compared to what we’re currently doing? And number three, is there a better way? And absolutely I think that we need to look at this within the realm of possibility. Is it possible for every person to show up at the polls on Election Day and use paper perfectly? No, it’s not, but we have to find a balance between safety and security, and serving our people. 

With vote by mail, I have to tell you, I have an employee who works here in my office, okay? She works here in my office. She has a disability, so she’s eligible to utilize mobile voting. So she is signed up to utilize the Voatz app in our elections but because she is an eligible voter, she still gets mailed a ballot, okay? In November of 2019, she cast her ballot. She never got a ballot in the mail, but she cast her ballot on the Voatz app. Last week, the US Postal Service delivered her ballot for [the] November of 2019 election.

Chris Stern: Wow.

Amelia Powers-Gardner: She was able to cast her ballot using Nimit’s Voatz app, and we have a vote-by-mail county. Now does that mean if she didn’t get her ballot in the mail, would she not have been able to vote? No, of course not, because we have checks and balances. 

She had several options. She could contact our office and say, “I never got a ballot,” and we would send her a new one. That’s one. Number two, she could show up at the polls on Election Day. And not only do we have paper at the polls available on Election Day, but we also have an express vote, which is a machine designed for people with disabilities to be able to vote. 

Every one of our polling locations has accessible machines for those with disabilities. It has paper at the polls for those that didn’t get a ballot or changed something or lost their ballot, or their kids thought it was junk mail and threw it away. We have several checks and balances along the way. In this case, her vote-by-mail ballot did not show up until six months after the election was over, but she was able to cast it on her phone, right? So every system we have is going to have vulnerabilities. Every system we have is not perfect. What we as administrators do is we work our best to make this as secure as we can for as many voters as possible with the resources that we’ve been given.

Chris Stern: Let me ask you. You said you’ve been hearing from folks around your state who are saying, “Why can’t we do this here in this county or in this municipality or in this city?” Are you hearing from folks outside of your state?

Amelia Powers-Gardner: Oh, absolutely. I get calls from advocacy groups outside our state saying, “What laws allow you to do this, and what information can you give to me so that I can bring that to my jurisdiction?” I also get a lot of calls from other jurisdictions outside the state, because we do vote by mail successfully, because we do mobile voting as well as polling locations. We do get a lot of people asking us, “How do you do what you do, and can we do the same?” 

So that’s great, which leads me to one other point I wanted to make. One of the things that has built insecurity to our election system in this country is the fact that the country doesn’t have one election vendor. They don’t have one election process. Elections are not run at the federal level. There’s some very high-level regulations at the federal level, but the majority of election law takes place at the state level. And even then, the majority of the election administration takes place at the local level. That actually brings us security. If we implemented broad mobile voting, but we had 25 vendors in the market and every local jurisdiction gets to pick the vendor they choose, a foreign actor couldn’t just hack one system and change an election, right? 

I think that’s something that we want to keep in mind that when we have a lot of jurisdictions running elections. Yes, you can have chaos in some areas. I mean, Broward County, Florida comes up. They had hanging chads, and in 2018 they had issues as well, right? Election administrators can cause chaos, but they can also bring in a level of professionalism. And they bring in a lot of ideas, and that brings security.

Chris Stern: Okay, thanks. We have just a few minutes left. I want to just go quickly through the panel starting with Emily. Anything that you think that we should quickly touch on that we haven’t poked during our conversation over the last 45 to 50 minutes?

Emily Frye: Thank you, Chris. I would like to foot-stomp and slightly expand something that Amelia played out. Are we comparing the current option on its level of security and credibility to the new option, or are we comparing this new technologically apparently greenfield to some unrealistic standard of perfection? I think that’s really important, and one particular example hits that home. In many cases, and a very unofficial example of how votes can be returned, actual completed ballots are returned is my unencrypted email. If we want to compare the Voatz solution or DemocracyLive or any other solution to unencrypted email, there’s really no question as to who wins. So we have to look at what we’re actually comparing in order to be sure that it’s a fair and accurate truth-telling.

Chris Stern: Okay, thank you. Asia, very quickly, any thoughts, final wrap-up thoughts?

Asia LaBrie: Just all the three points I’d highlight that we need to do to make this happen is the standards, and the frameworks, and include research in there, move universities to provide solutions and keep doing the baby steps, pilots, phases, Nimit.

Chris Stern: Okay, thanks, and Nimit?

Nimit Sawhney: Thank you. Thank you, Chris. I think I would echo everybody else on the panel and say that the faster we can come up with a base set of standards, I think that would be really, really helpful for the industry, for putting forward more innovative ideas. So I would really urge the community, all the stakeholders, to prioritize that and wholeheartedly be willing to contribute wherever we are needed. Thank you.

Chris Stern: Great, and Amelia?

Amelia Powers-Gardner: I think you’ve had a fantastic panel today. I’m very impressed with Emily and Asia and always Nimit. You guys absolutely were spot on. We need standards. We need solutions. We need to compare this to what we’re currently doing, absolutely could not agree more. And lastly, I think instead of finding new people budding in this, new companies budding in this space, instead of trying to squash each one, I think the industry needs more competition and more solutions that can meet these standards.

Chris Stern: Great, thanks. And Perianne, if you’re there, I’ll hand it back to you. Thank you so much.

Perianne Boring: Thanks so much, Chris. That was a really wonderful conversation. Appreciate you, Chris, moderating that. What a cool opportunity to get to hear directly from elections officials that are on-the-ground, elections and voter technology experts to really help set the stage of what the full scope of the challenges are when we talk about voter technology, and the potential role blockchain technology has to play in this ecosystem. 

I really appreciated Amelia’s point that a vote not cast changes the outcome of an election just as much as a changed vote. And thanks Amelia, for that call to action for the industry standards, absolutely agree and believe that there needs to be a conversation between the public and the private sector, and so many of the most important initiatives throughout the US in technology and innovation have been a public and private sector collaborative effort, whether that’s commercializing the internet, or putting the man on the moon, or building out a safe and secure electronic voting strategy for the United States. 

That balance between the public and the private sector is absolutely essential. And it’s also essential that all populations have the tools that they need to exercise their right to vote. The world’s moving forward. Technology is moving forward, and voter technology – it has to move forward too, but it needs to be done in a way that does not compromise integrity. So I want to thank all of our speakers for joining us today, for sharing your insights. And thanks to all of our attendees for coming and watching, and learning more about this topic with us. For more content hosted by the Chamber of Digital Commerce, we’d like to invite you to Parallel. This is our virtual summit. Our next event for Parallel episode number four, titled ‘Surviving and Thriving’, will be on September 18th, 2020. You can join at parallelsummit.org. Thanks again for joining us. I look forward to seeing you next month at Parallel.

A Fireside Chat: West Virginia Secretary of State, Congressman Soto & Jonathan Johnson

Below is a transcription of a recent webinar involving a Fireside Chat between West Virginia Secretary of State Mac Warner, Congressman Soto and moderated by Jonathan Johnson. The transcription has been repurposed with permission from the Chamber of Digital Commerce and has been lightly edited for clarity.

Full Fireside Chat can be viewed here.

Perianne Boring: Welcome to today’s webinar, Beyond the Pandemic: Has Voting Changed Forever? My name’s Perianne Boring. I’m the founder and president of the Chamber of Digital Commerce. If you’re not familiar with the chamber, we are a trade association representing companies that are innovating with watching technologies.

And we strive to be a resource to government, policymakers, public-sector stakeholders as they’re navigating through this new and exciting technology frontier. Today’s discussion centers around one of the most important constitutional rights we all have as Americans, voting. And it’s not only our right, but it’s our responsibility to vote.

And unfortunately, participation in many elections, particularly in local elections remains dismal and is significantly below rates that we’ve seen in other countries, in other developed countries. In over the past two decades, the US has had to reckon with a number of just inherent flaws and the election infrastructure and the processes around them.

We can’t forget what happened in the 2000s with the hanging chads, in 2016 the interference, and today we are scrambling to implement vote by mail in time for the November election. With the advent of COVID-19, it’s highlighted an acute and a pressing need to develop new ways of voting, especially solutions that can withstand unforeseen circumstances to critically address election security, voter accessibility, and our health, all while upholding the integrity of the results.

And these solutions will necessarily require the responsible integration of technology, but how? As we learned from a recent hearing in the US House of Representatives, the broad consensus was that, yes, now is the time to explore remote voting options that leverage technology. So in today’s conversation, we’ve got a pretty rare and unique opportunity as we explore this critical question of our time.

We’ve got an amazing group of experts lined up. We have a member from the US House of Representatives. We have a secretary of state here, cybersecurity experts, voting experts, technology experts and other election officials as we explore the current state of voting, how the pandemic is shifting election operations as we speak, the successful use case of smartphone voting that’s emerged in just the past two years and what to consider as we look towards the future of voting.

So our first session is moderated by Jonathan Johnson. Jonathan is the CEO of Overstock.com, which was one of the very first public companies that blockchain-enabled their payment options. He’s also the president of Medici Ventures. This is a fireside chat he’ll be moderating between the co-chair of the Congressional Blockchain Caucus, US Representative Darren Soto and the West Virginia Secretary of State Mac Warner. Jonathan, over to you.

Jonathan Johnson: Thank you, Perianne, and thanks to everyone who’s on. I’m really excited about this conversation.

Some of the themes I’d like to discuss are what are we doing about the election in a time when going to the polls poses a health risk. What’s the role of technology in voting in this new paradigm? What are our leaders doing on the ground? And in many fields, we’re witnessing unprecedented scientific technology in humanitarian collaboration.

How does that apply to the evolution of how we vote? 

So let me first introduce our fireside chat panelists.

Mac Warner is the West Virginia Secretary of State. He’s serving in his fourth year as West Virginia’s chief election officer. He’s a graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point, West Virginia University School of Law and holds a master’s degree in international law from the University of Virginia and the US Army War College.

Prior to serving as secretary of state, Secretary Warner devoted 23 years of service to the United States Army before retiring at the rank of lieutenant colonel. After his retirement, Secretary Warner spent five additional years in Afghanistan with the US State Department, and I love this picture. While in Afghanistan, Secretary Warner and his daughter, Lieutenant Lisa Warner-Miller, learned how difficult it was for deployed members of the military to cast an absentee ballot of mail.

He set out to find a way to ensure that military men and women could cast a ballot and vote in every election.

Congressman Darren Soto was elected in the US House of Representatives in 2016 and represents Central Florida after serving for a decade in the Florida legislature.

He began his career in politics at the age of 29 and is a proud graduate of Rutgers University and George Washington University School of Law. Representative Soto, my father is a GW law grad, so we share that association. He’s the first Floridian of Puerto Rican descent serving Congress and co-chairs, as Perianne mentioned, the Congressional Blockchain Caucus, which has grown to 17 members with near-even representation on both sides of the aisle.

Representative Soto’s view is that blockchain might be the most secure solution to many of the logistical challenges the federal government faces, including tracking and transmitting data. So let me start with you, Secretary Warner. Let’s get right down to it. I know you’ve implemented a major reform when it comes to elections in West Virginia. Can you tell us a bit about that?

Mac Warner: Sure. First, thanks to the Digital Chamber of Commerce for hosting this event, and what a timely topic as we all are entering into the general November 3rd election. What West Virginia has done is we’ve reached out.

The key to our perspective is providing voters options. And so, one key component of that to those people at the far fringes of the world, mainly our military and deployed situations on the hillsides of Afghanistan and submarines under the polar ice cap, perhaps even astronauts out there in outer space.

By the way, a roommate of my brother’s from West Point is heading up in the next space shuttle. That’s why I mentioned that, but those are examples of how people who rely on the traditional means, say the US Postal Service, to cast a ballot are going to be disenfranchised as we saw with the COVID-19 in this primary election. 180 countries had their postal service disrupted due to the pandemic, actually stopped in many cases.

So if you were a West Virginia citizen serving overseas or a student or somebody say working at one of our embassies, you would have been disenfranchised. Your vote would not have been able to reach the county clerks in time. So that’s why West Virginia in 2018 led an electronic voting option, and it was very successful. We had people from 31 countries, and we’re a small state, 1.2 million registered voters.

And we had people from 31 countries who were able to cast a ballot electronically. That was so successful that just this last year, our legislature in a bipartisan effort, unanimous vote.

Both parties said, “We’re going to extend that to voters with certain disabilities so people who cannot reach the polls due to their physical disability can also vote electronically.”

So we can talk more about that, but that’s just a quick overview of how West Virginia has taken the initiative to allow people to vote electronically.

Jonathan Johnson: Thank you, Secretary Warner.

I can’t imagine a more important group to have vote than our military. They’re defending our rights to vote, and we make it so hard for them to vote.

I’m glad that you’ve been on the cutting edge in doing that. Representative Soto, you live in Florida, which unfortunately is a place that’s notorious for hanging chads and the current outbreak of COVID. What are your thoughts on the election this year, and how do we both secure it but also enable the safety when it comes to those voting?

Darren Soto: Well, first as to hanging chads, I was still a senior in college when that happened. You have to give me a pass on that one. I can tell you though that we did get to work on modernizing Florida’s election system. Many of those reforms were still going on by the time I got into the legislature in 2007, including having machine-counted paper ballots that you fill out the circle rather than having any of these old hanging-chad machines.

So we’ve revamped that. When we look at the coronavirus pandemic that we’re facing right now in all states, and July was a tough month for Florida as you’ve mentioned. We’ve gone down quite a bit since then, but we’re the third most populous state and South Florida in particular. I represent the Central Florida area, was particularly hard hit by it.

We expect 60, maybe even 70%, turnout in vote by mail, both in the primary and in general elections. You do not need an excuse in Florida, and we see it very popular with both parties historically for many years. And so, now there’s still a paper ballot. So there’s no issue about afterwards doing the audits, that I know Secretary Warner has to do a few days after the election and others, to make sure that the results that are announced that night comport with the samples they do from the paper ballots themselves, but the key is there’s always a concern about fraud.

And there’s always a concern about how to get folks who are not in state but are Floridians their ballots, and Florida for several years now has accepted ballots via email by our service members.

And I concur with both of you that it is one of the greatest duties of each state and of the federal government to ensure that those who serve and defend our country are not disenfranchised.

I couldn’t think of a more disgraceful thing for what we ask of all these folks out across the world serving in various different capacities. So the question is how do we make sure that that’s safe? And that’s where utilizing blockchain technology with it being a fixed ledger can ensure that accuracy and that it can’t be changed afterwards, like it’s done with so many transactions that we see in cryptocurrency.

We allow for online registration in Florida, but there’s no online voting outside of these specific cases with military veterans.

So that would be a great place to start, like Secretary Warner’s doing in West Virginia and see how that fairs as we ramp it to a bigger program. In the meantime, what we’re also doing is there was over $400 billion in grants to the various states to be able to assist with the upcoming election.

And there is more money in the HEROES Act, 25 billion to be exact, for the post office to assist them. The current offer’s around five billion. The 25 billion would have been over several years to help them out.

That would be just for this year, but clearly there will be an increasing role as we get to more electronic ballots for those who can’t get there, and blockchain will be that stabilizing factor to keep the integrity of our elections.

Jonathan Johnson: Thank you. Representative Warner, I want to draw on two things that, or Secretary Warner, two things that Representative Soto said. One, he talked about auditing votes, and part of your role as the chief election officer in West Virginia is to be able to audit votes.

As you’ve used mobile voting, has there been an ability to audit and even have a paper audit?

And then, the second question I want to ask you is Representative Soto talked about Congress appropriating more to help in voting. I know that you’ve sent open letters to congressional leaders, as well as the secretary of defense and calling on them to do more. Talk to me about both those things, the ability to audit and your desire, what Congress can do.

Mac Warner: Sure, thank you for giving me an opportunity to address both of those. First, the audit piece, there are two systems. One, we used in 2018, and that was an app-based system. And then, now we’re using a web-based system, but both of these are excellent programs, and they both provide that audit ability that you referred to. And that’s the idea behind a pilot is you start, and you see if there are any… how it’s received, any technical glitches and so forth.

So in 2018, we had that ability by way of when the voter cast the vote using the app, emails went out. One came back to the voter so they could see what they actually voted. One went to the secretary of state’s office, mine, for audibility purposes. And then, the third went to the county clerk, which would be printed off and then counted just like any other ballot.

And since that time, they’ve even added a secure component. This can all be done with anonymity so that it maintains the secret ballot. The same thing goes with the web-based program that we’re doing right now. Think about being able to be transported into the cloud, and then a third-party auditor could compare the vote that was cast with the vote that was received and ensure that there was no man-in-the-middle attack and so forth.

So we are overcoming some of the objections that were originally cast upon this by MIT and the University of Michigan and various other players out there. We’ve overcome that, and now it’s time for that acceptability to take place and it is. It’s gaining more. These systems are being tried in more and more locations.

It’s now about a handful of states and municipalities where this is occurring. And so, that auditability is a key component of it. Know that this is in place now. The second part of the question, if you’ll remind me what that was.

Jonathan Johnson: It was you’ve sent an open letter to Congress and the defense secretary. What are you asking Congress to do, and why is this important?

Mac Warner: Well, they’re talking about the hundreds and millions of dollars. I think that 10 or 20 million of that could be set aside and go towards expanding this pilot program. We’re allowing it for voters, soldiers, from West Virginia. I think all DoD soldiers should have this opportunity.

I’ll make the analogy to Mark Twain’s the right word is the difference between lightning and lightning bug. Just telling somebody their right is like the lightning bug. Giving them that right, giving them that opportunity to vote, that’s lightning. That’s powerful and that’s what I’m about with the electronic voting. I want to give that soldier on the hillside in Afghanistan the ability to vote.

It’s hard to transport a piece of paper via the mail. I went for about six months in Afghanistan without having been able to send mail because of attacks and so forth, but electronically we transport battlefield information via satellite, via technology, via the internet. And every soldier has that handheld device, whether it’s GPS or other secure technology.

And if we can do that, we can give them the right to vote using that same secure technology. So my request to Congressman Soto and what I’ve requested to the leadership with House, Senate and the DoD is to continue with this pilot program. We’ve tried it here in West Virginia. One quick example, a Peace Corps volunteer in West Africa from West Virginia was able to vote electronically, and she was the envy of all of her other folks.

She even mentioned a particular Peace Corps volunteer from Florida who said, “How can West Virginia vote electronically and we’re a much larger state, and we don’t have that capability?” We need this acceptance, and I think DoD doing it, as we’ve all discussed, giving that right and that power, that opportunity for soldiers to vote, if that was done across DoD, you’d have soldiers from all 50 states.

And then, those states can start looking at their individual laws and adjusting their system so they can allow their folks. We need to start small. I think the soldiers is the right demographic. And once it’s proven there, then you can use a wider audience, such as we’re now experiencing with the pandemic. Had we done this two or four years ago, I think a lot of us would be voting electronically during the pandemic, but thank you for letting me address those.

Jonathan Johnson: No, it’s great. And I’ll note, I live in Utah. We’ve done some of this voting, both for military and military families and the disabled in Utah. It’s really fantastic. Representative Soto, there was recently a House hearing with a big takeaway, and that was talking about exploring remote voting for members of Congress during crisis situation.

This seems like a really significant milestone to me. I’ve long thought we’ve got to have members of Congress living among their constituents rather than living among the lobbyists in Washington DC. How do you think mobile voting, particularly safe, secure, auditable mobile voting, might affect the future of the body of Congress or their positives or their downsides. What are your thoughts there?

Darren Soto: Sure, let’s start with two points of context before going into it. One, ever since about 1994 when Newt Gingrich became speaker, it became much more the expectation that members of Congress go back to their districts, and that has shifted ever since then. So for instance, I’m right now in Kissimmee, Florida five blocks from my house in our district office speaking to you, and I love coming home.

I live in Central Florida, so I can’t wait to get out of DC after my job’s done to come back and engage with my constituents, and that’s true for most members of Congress. We spend about 50% of our time in Washington and about 50% home, and some people live in other time zones. They have to take multiple planes, so it’s even tougher for them.

Then, two is that we’re in a pandemic. And not only would it be a response for us to all gather all at once in one big block for the health of members with preexisting conditions and those who are seniors, but it also could affect national security, if we had a huge outbreak of the coronavirus among the Congress and incapacitated the legislative body for the most powerful nation on Earth.

So we vote in waves and give the option for proxy voting, and so you have still around 80, 85% of the members who are still casting their votes in person with that option even there. We cast in waves, but that was important. First of all, the Senate was doing it already for a month or two before we started and doing hybrid teleconference hearings.

You have the option to go to the hearing in person. You could attend from your office or otherwise via Webex, and even the Supreme Court talk about… The most antiquated of the three branches, even they did teleconferencing before we did. So it was really time for the House to do it. The House Republicans sued the majority. They got knocked out of court just the other day, because it’s a separation of powers issue.

And we have the right to be able to make those rules, and it has bipartisan support in the Senate anyway, and most of the executive branches are meeting that way. So it’s absolutely critical for the functioning of our nation. We proposed during the time period where Democrats and Republicans on the Rules Committee were making a determination on proxy voting to use a blockchain system.

While it was not accepted, because they really wanted to rally behind a form of voting that’s been utilized many times in American history before, proxy voting, which is much more just person to person. Someone can hold as many as 10 proxies, although no one’s holding 10 proxies right now in Congress, because most people are voting in person still, but it was considered.

And the committee staff is reviewing it as a way to remote vote. Right now though, it’s done by email per vote to the member who is the proxy-holder. And usually, people are holding one to two, three proxies at max right now based upon my experience. So at least Congress is starting to consider those things. The issue of progress in the blockchain area in Congress isn’t a partisan issue.

It’s more of overcoming ignorance and educating the members more and more of the importance of this technology, and assuring integrity in internet transactions in voting and in other systems that we will come to rely on more and more. So there is some progress being made, but certainly, there’s still a lot of education left to go.

Jonathan Johnson: Thank you. Let me close by sharing an anecdote. I live in congressional district three in Utah. In 2017, our congressman resigned and we had a special election in a closed primary. It was conducted all vote by mail. Some of the county clerks in this district sent out ballots, not just to Republicans in a closed primary but to independents and others.

Vote by mail can suffer from human error. In that election, our state auditor noted that the privacy sheath that was included in the vote by mail was see-through. Everyone that voted with the expectation of a secret ballot had that taken away. This can be solved with electronic mobile voting that is safe, secure and auditable using blockchain technology.

It’s time to come to the future. Secretary Warner, Representative Soto, I appreciate you not just being thought leaders but being action leaders as we look at ways to improve one of our most sacred rights as Americans. And I think blockchain technology is one of the keys to doing this. So thanks for what you’re doing on the frontlines. Keep at it and thanks for participating in this fireside chat.

Mac Warner: Thank you, Jonathan.

Darren Soto: Thanks so much.

Perianne Boring: Thanks so much, really appreciate Secretary Warner and Congressman Soto and Jonathan Johnson for that fascinating conversation and really outlining why this needs to be a priority, why this matters, who this matters to, our service members. We talked about those who are serving our country need to have a safe and reliable way to exercise their right to vote.

People with disabilities oftentimes are left out of this conversation and also appreciate Congressman Soto highlighting why this is not a partisan issue. This is about ensuring the appropriate technologies are deployed in a safe way so all Americans can exercise this sacred right to vote, so thank you.

Dear DefCon Voting Village, Thanks for Including Us

We are grateful to the Voting Village for championing an inclusive “safe mode” DefCon experience this year. Today, inclusivity within the hacker community—just as we’re seeing across the country—is more important than ever. Our shared goals, too, are more important than ever. 

We’re particularly glad to be part of this gathering. It’s really good to see you, and good to be seen. 

We’d like to spend a few moments, now that we are all together, to reaffirm our commitment to this community, to establish a path forward that ensures we have a standard for working together, and finally, to clarify and pose a question to this community around misconstrued information for which we take responsibility for not clearing up sooner. 

We recognize and acknowledge that many have been upset with us—even outraged. We appreciate we’re operating in a critical space and don’t take lightly the pressures from all sides of the aisle. 

Some people don’t like what we’re trying to do—straight up. Some are upset because we require voters to provide an ID for verification. Some say our work is not secure, some say we aren’t transparent. Some—though maybe implicitly—don’t like what we do because our work would allow more people to vote. Some have called us a threat to democracy. 

We hear you. We recognize you care about our democracy. As participants in this space, we are grateful for your voice and participation. We recognize it is critical to have differing opinions, and healthy debate.  

We will be the first in line to say we are not perfect—just like the United States’ current voting system isn’t perfect. We are sure we could have navigated situations with better clarity in the past. 

We are here for an important reason, and we are firmly committed to doing better, each and every day, in service of our mission—that those who are disenfranchised with their current voting options—whether military, overseas or disabled voters—have access to a safe, secure, verifiable method of voting. In our view, and we hope yours too, email, fax, and postal mail simply do not cut it for these groups. They are neither reliable or secure and for some, they violate their right to a private ballot.

In light of our mission, we must say this—our ability to collaborate with you all is critical.  

A Code of Conduct for Elections

We believe the Voting Village at DefCon is an opportunity to create a pathway for this collaboration, where inclusivity and a code of ethics are clearly outlined. We look forward to being part of the conversation with you, and we’re curious about what we all, collectively, can learn from the Voting Village’s Code of Conduct as a model for how we might govern election platforms, election officials, and researchers to avoid miscommunication and misinformation. 

In the end, it is up to all of us to set and maintain a standard. 

Finally, we’d like to address the situation that has pitted a few passionate voices against us because, respectfully, it is a textbook case of misreporting and repetition escalated into a dangerous environment of misinformation and mistrust. 

The 2018 Attempted Intrusion: What Happened 


First, we’d like to lead with the fact that we have never reported anyone to the FBI, nor to any law enforcement. 

Here’s what happened: an attempted hack was made during the West Virginia midterm election in October 2018. The Voatz system was being used to service the state’s deployed military voters, their families, and overseas citizens. 

The attempt was identified and blocked, and we reported the activity to the West Virginia state elections team as per standard and required protocols. We did not report anyone to the FBI, nor to any law enforcement. This is not our role. 

For context, election infrastructure in the U.S. is designated by the DHS as “critical infrastructure”, along with 15 other sectors, which makes any tampering and interference a federal crime. There are established procedures for reporting any attempts made on critical infrastructure. 

The actor(s) who made the attempt in 2018 had not registered for our public bug bounty program, nor used the test system available on the bug bounty program. They did not reach out to us to indicate that their activities were in good faith, and they performed activities that were indistinguishable in terms of a malicious or well-intentioned user. 

As stewards of critical infrastructure, authorities in West Virginia called upon the US Attorney’s Office and held a press conference to issue their report on the attack, resulting in an FBI investigation. At this event, United States Attorney Mike Stuart issued a strong statement emphasizing the seriousness of election security.

Voatz does not doubt that the actors may have made some assumptions that led them to believe that attacking a live election system may have been permissible. As per the United States Attorney Mike Stuart’s statement, this is not allowed. 

One of our core operating principles is to consistently monitor, assess, and report on all aspects of the development and piloting process of our platform. That means reporting all attempts to our client (the jurisdiction). Failing to report a threat to the (jurisdiction) would be an oversight as a company entrusted to ensure that ballots are delivered securely. 

There have also been claims that our bug bounty program in use at that time was retroactively updated. To be clear, this is false. All updates were recorded by the public bug bounty system, and there is no way for bug bounty terms to be retroactively applied or updated without showing the update timestamps, or for them to appear in its change history.

Despite this statement and our efforts to clear the misinformation, we are fully aware of the suspicion against us and that some, no matter the facts, will not accept them—this is the nature of the current media landscape. Our commitment is that we will continue to be available for those who wish to collaborate with us.

Conclusion & Call to Action

Finally, we’d like to end with an open call. This space, as you all well know, is inherently complex. We’d like to invite you into an open dialogue around how you might consider the roles of all participating parties in our critical infrastructure—whether election officials, cybersecurity experts, or voting technology providers. It will take all of us the ability to work together to ensure the security of this very critical infrastructure.

It is abundantly clear that we have the same goal—protecting voters and their ability to participate in our democracy—and we all must be able to enter into dialogue. How should we work together for that goal? We firmly believe that we must move forward to expand more secure options beyond mail-in voting, email, and fax, and we need to do that as a community. Taking a cue from this Voting Village, what should our “Code of Conduct” be for working together and paving a path forward to secure our elections?

We would love to hear from you, whether in the form of participating in our bug bounty program, or with your thought and feedback sent to the email ID (cos at voatz dot com), where you can reach us with follow-up reflections and questions. We will respond in private (if you prefer),  or publish responses and questions post DefCon.

We welcome your feedback and look forward to collaborating—and, truly, thank you for welcoming us.

The Mailbox Won’t Save Us: Exclusive Interview with County Clerk Amelia Powers-Gardner

Below is the transcription of an interview conducted by David Cohen, Co-Founder and Managing Director of Techstars, the global platform for investment and innovation that connects entrepreneurs, investors, and corporations. 

David interviewed Amelia Powers-Gardner on this year’s election, her experience deploying the latest technology on the front lines, and more.

Amelia Powers-Gardner is county clerk of Utah County in Utah and was sworn into office in January 2019. Amelia is one of Government Technology 2020’s Top 25 Doers, Dreamers and Drivers.

(view full interview here)

David Cohen: Amelia, let’s start by talking about the Utah County election system for managing voting before you got there. I think the headline that announced your rival said something like Power has a way forward to fix the dysfunction in the elections office. So how was it like when you found it?

Amelia Powers-Gardner: The elections office when I came in, was really severely under resourced, and it was like all of their processes had been put together piecemeal. They had gone to vote by mail about a year and a half earlier, and in that process, they hadn’t laid out a workflow they had just kind of added a whole bunch of elements and shoved them together. They processed ballots in two buildings on three floors in six locations, moving ballots back and forth. At the polling locations, they were significantly under resourced, and that caused long lines, and basically a lot of chaos. Also, there was really no way to communicate with voters. They had no social media accounts, no email lists, no active communication with the voters. So dysfunction is probably a pretty good way to describe how it was.

David Cohen: One of the maverick sort of things that I know Utah County happens to be the first in the country to allow people with disabilities to vote remotely, tell me about the original conversation there and how that played out?

Amelia Powers-Gardner: Yeah, we did a pilot for mobile voting and it was for our overseas and military members. After that pilot, we did an audit, the audit came back clean. We surveyed everyone who had used it, those who surveyed loved it. We didn’t have negative feedback from those that had actually used the system it was all very positive. And as I looked at that I wanted to look at other demographics that could be served, underserved populations that we could, sort of utilizing this. As we looked at the law, it said that anything used for overseas voters can also be used for the disabled community. It was really a no brainer at that point. This is a demographic of people that are currently being underserved, and that we could really use some sort of a method to help serve them. It was a natural extension.

David Cohen: So I’d like to hear about the results that you had. What were the reactions of the voters who heard this news and used these technologies?

Amelia Powers-Gardner: That’s a great question. What’s interesting about this is the most positive feedback we have received has been feedback from people who have actually used the system. Those people that were being underserved, they found that sometimes mailing in a ballot is not as simple as putting a stamp on it and putting in the mailbox, and the alternate methods really put a barrier to them voting. Those that have used this system are our biggest advocates, and they give us the most positive feedback.

Those that have used [mobile voting] are our biggest advocates, and they give us the most positive feedback.

David Cohen: Because we’re talking about innovation specific to COVID-19, I also want to ask you about a voter who voted after a kidney transplant, and the oldest voter in America to have ever voted online. Can you tell us that story?

Amelia Powers-Gardner: Yeah, we have two different people that we’ve served in the last several elections, one of them is a recent kidney transplant, couldn’t leave their house, and frankly their wife didn’t want to leave the house either because she didn’t want to be exposed to anything that she could bring home. And this person didn’t have a reliable smartphone, we were able to bring them a tablet that they could then sanitize and they could cast their ballot using that. Because of the kidney transplant, they were in a long term care facility and therefore they didn’t get their ballot in the mail. They were still able to cast a vote, utilizing this electronic system independently. And for them, security is more than just a technological thing, it’s also a germ thing and they were able to do that.

The other person, the hundred and six year old, in fact she’ll be 107 this year, Maccene Grimmet, she broke her ankle about two years ago and is bedridden. Her caretaker is her daughter, who at 106, Maccene’s daughter is in her 80s, and Maccene can’t really hold a pencil very steadily but she’s very mentally astute, very spry, just can’t walk and has a hard time with arthritis holding a pencil. A paper ballot was difficult for her. We were able to give her an iPad, the print’s plenty large enough, she was able to read that ballot, cast her vote independently and with dignity. And the greatest thing about Maccene is, she is really passionate about being able to vote in every election. Maccene was born before women in the United States had a right to vote. So being able to cast her ballot every election is incredibly important to her. And we were able to facilitate that using technology.

David Cohen: Wow, those are terrific stories. And with an aging population and more people falling sick, lots of people in hospital beds, unable to access those mail-in ballots. What specific innovations are out there that would be helpful to get them to vote?

If someone’s in a hospital bed, they’re not at home getting their mail, so we can’t mail them a ballot. Also, it might be hard to verify their identity. But if they have a smartphone that has a thumbprint on it, then their phone can verify their identity for us, and we can ensure they’re getting the right ballot, and that they’re getting it in a timely manner.

Amelia Powers-Gardner: There’s several things that we need to do. There’s some that we have, like mobile voting is becoming more accessible. That’s absolutely something that we need to consider. If someone’s in a hospital bed, they’re not at home getting their mail, so we can’t mail them a ballot. Also, it might be hard to verify their identity. But if they have a smartphone that has a thumbprint on it, then their phone can verify their identity for us, and we can ensure they’re getting the right ballot, and that they’re getting it in a timely manner. We also can do more securely germ-wise, right? A piece of paper could have a virus that it could carry on. I think we’re hearing that the COVID-19 virus can last possibly days on a piece of paper, but if you have your phone, you can wipe that down with a Clorox wipe. And it’s only exposed to you you’re not handing it to a nurse who’s putting it in an envelope, who’s giving it to the mailman, who’s giving it to our election workers. It’s more sanitary, it’s more accessible. If someone is sitting in a hospital bed all day, chances are, they’re on Instagram. And if they’re on Instagram, they can vote.

If someone is sitting in a hospital bed all day, chances are, they’re on Instagram. And if they’re on Instagram, they can vote.

David Cohen: I’m already wiping my phone down three times a day anyway, so this will work great for me. So I read the news like everybody else and I’m curious your perspective on this, you know what’s missing in the national discourse when we’re talking about finding solutions for safe and secure elections? November… even in the future, what frustrates you when you read the news?

Amelia Powers-Gardner: Right now, one of the most frustrating things for me is we have a political party that’s pushing for vote by mail nationwide. I’m not opposed to vote by mail – I’m a vote by mail county. I have about 300,000 registered voters in my county, and we mail every single one of them a ballot, every election. I think vote by mail is great. But what a lot of people don’t realize is that we had to put in our order for our envelopes for vote by mail in October. We had to solidify our schedule with the print vendors in December. We had to finalize those schedules in January. We’re four months past that right now. And in some cases and envelopes six months past that. You can’t just go down to your local print vendor on the corner and say, “Can you run a safe and secure election for me?”

I think vote by mail is great. But what a lot of people don’t realize is that we had to put in our order for our envelopes for vote by mail in October, had to solidify our schedule with the print vendors in December, had to finalize those schedules in January. We’re four months past that right now. You can’t just go down to your local print vendor on the corner and say, “Can you run a safe and secure election for me?”

In my county, I couldn’t go down to even Kinkos and say, “I have 300,000 people, and they belong to 300 different precincts and each one of those precincts receives a different ballot and it needs to be safe, and it needs to be secure, and it has to be timely. Can you make that happen?” We simply don’t have the bandwidth. You need to have print vendors that have experience and expertise in this. Those print vendors, this is not their small year. This isn’t a small municipal election. This is their biggest year, a presidential year. In an off year, a municipal year, they’re working one shift and they’ve got maybe some direct mail campaigns to kind of keep their presses running. And they could probably push that off and ramp up their production.

This year in a presidential year, they’re working three shifts. They have all of their assembly lines working, and they’ve been scheduled for a year. We can’t just turn a key and say, can every one of you triple your production because they don’t have capacity. They don’t have buildings, they don’t have machines. And the machines they use are custom order, most of them made in Germany and they’re a year or two out. We can’t turn a key and make vote by mail happen nationwide like that. What we can do is utilize a smartphone. The vast majority of Americans have a phone that they could use to securely vote, and then those that don’t, we could probably pick up the slack with the vote by mail. But a lot of people aren’t looking at the logistics. It’s not as simple as a piece of paper and an envelope when you’re talking about a safe, secure election.

We can’t turn a key and make vote by mail happen nationwide like that. What we can do is utilize a smartphone. The vast majority of Americans have a phone that they could use to securely vote, and then those that don’t, we could probably pick up the slack with the vote by mail. But a lot of people aren’t looking at the logistics. It’s not as simple as a piece of paper and an envelope when you’re talking about a safe, secure election.

David Cohen: It is one of the magical things about online it’s bits and bytes and it can be immediately distributed and immediately used.

Amelia Powers-Gardner: Technology is scalable in a way that paper and pencil just isn’t.

David Cohen: So before you go Amelia, talk to me about some of the gaps in the voting system that have been exposed by the Coronavirus. What should tech startups be thinking about? I’m an investor, where should I be making more investments to help? How do you best see the public and private sector sort of working together here?

Amelia Powers-Gardner: It’s a great question. I see two areas. One of them is polling locations. There’s a lot of issues with polling locations. It used to be that we did polling in elementary schools all over the country. In today’s society, we can’t have 1000 random people walking into an elementary school on a school day. That’s just not something we can have. On top of that I talked about it a little earlier, the vast majority of poll workers across the nation are retired, which means that they’re in that age demographic. Even if the polling locations are open, and people are willing to show up at the polls, in Clark County in Illinois, they had polling locations where no poll workers showed up, because they didn’t want to be exposed to the virus. Polling locations create a lot of logistical issues.

Technology is scalable in a way that paper and pencil just isn’t.

The second major issue is our voter database. That’s everything from the security of our database, Imagine vote by mail, if somebody messed with the addresses on my 300,000 voters, that could cause some serious problems. I would love to see our voter database put in the blockchain, because then if somebody changed those addresses, if they messed with that information, we would have a record of that change. So that’s part of the identity issue. The other part is verifying your identity. And a lot of cases right now you have to show up in person and pull out your ID, the government issued ID. If we can electronically verify someone’s identity, then we can allow them to cast a ballot, we can allow them to register to vote without having to physically be there in person, and then managing that database.

David Cohen: As an investor who’s invested in a couple thousand tech startups, one of the things that I’ve learned is that sometimes buzzwords and new technologies are the things that scare people. So blockchain, is what some people hear is unproven. Does that really work? Is that really secure? Do you think that plays a role in the psyche that maybe we ought to at first depend on much more long term established technologies than necessarily trying to use the latest, greatest thing?

If we can electronically verify someone’s identity, then we can allow them to cast a ballot, we can allow them to register to vote without having to physically be there in person.

Amelia Powers-Gardner: Well, I think if those technologies have the ability to give us an immutable record, then yes. I link to blockchain because it gives us an immutable record. If something is changed, we know it. If we can do that with an existing technology I’m not opposed to it. But currently, we have our voter databases, they have all the protections of a server you can think of. We have secure transfer services to our print vendor. But let’s say it’s secure on our end then we send it to a print vendor, if someone hacks into that print vendor’s system and messes with those addresses, just prior to them printing labels and sending out our vote by mail, once again that could wreak havoc. I would love for them to have the ability to check that record against an immutable record.

The vast majority of people utilize their cell phone to do their banking, fill out the census, send money, purchase items — they put their most private information on their phone. The vast majority of people are excited about mobile voting and they want it, they just don’t happen to be the loudest in the crowd.

One thing that I want to point out is, the vast majority of the people, they utilize their cell phone to do their banking, they fill out the census, they send money, they purchase items, they put their most private information on their phone. The vast majority of people are excited about mobile voting and they want it, they just don’t happen to be the loudest in the crowd.

David Cohen: That’s awesome. Yeah, I totally agree with that.

Voatz Completes Mobile Voting Election in South Dakota

Summary: The Republican party of South Dakota offered mobile voting to all delegates in its virtual convention last weekend with 85% delegates voting through the Voatz app. 50% of those voters submitted ballots within the first 20 minutes of the voting window. 


Boston, June 25, 2020 — Following the momentum of successful virtual conventions in both Utah and Arizona, last weekend Voatz successfully completed its third virtual convention with no incidents, generating elevated participation numbers and record engagement. The convention brought together delegates from 31 counties and concluded on Saturday, June 20, 2020. 

Dan Lederman, Chairman of the South Dakota Republican Party, said “Our goal was to create a convention experience that energized the Republican party in South Dakota and replicated an in-person convention. An uncontested convention did not deter delegates from voting, because it was easy. It was a team effort – Voatz worked with us for four weeks ahead of the convention to credential delegates, ensure a smooth rollout, and provide a test vote to get delegates comfortable with the system. It was a successful day for the South Dakota Republican Party.” 

“Voatz is proud to partner with the South Dakota Republican Party to securely enable their delegates to vote in their convention while, most importantly, keeping them safe during this uncertain time,” says Voatz Co-Founder and CEO, Nimit Sawhney. “This was the first time voters in South Dakota were able to vote through a mobile app in an election, and we were glad to see the enthusiastic response. More than half of the voters using the app submitted their ballot within the first 20 minutes of the voting window opening.  Voatz is excited to replicate the successes we’ve seen in the Utah and Arizona Republican Party Conventions, where record numbers of delegates submitted their votes seamlessly.” 

The successful use of mobile voting in South Dakota is an excellent roadmap for election officials looking to expand voting options in states where mail-in voting and polling places are likely to be impacted by Coronavirus. A mobile voting solution would bring relief to anywhere the population skews more elderly

The South Dakota Republican Party chose Voatz as the mobile voting platform for its virtual convention after clear demonstrations that Voatz could handle the dynamic nature of the convention and the potential for runoff rounds of voting. The platform allowed delegates to vote securely, privately, and electronically through their mobile phones. Voatz helped make the voting process safe and verifiable for delegates and candidates.      


Voatz is an award-winning mobile elections platform that leverages cutting-edge technology (including biometrics and a blockchain-based infrastructure) to increase access and security in elections. Since 2016 Voatz has run more than 65 elections with cities, universities, towns, nonprofits, and both major state political parties for convention voting. Learn more here.

We Cannot Afford to Dismiss Online Voting

Below is a letter from Voatz CEO to the editor of The Economist in response to last month’s article, “Why voting online is not the way to hold an election in a pandemic“.


Dear Editor of The Economist,

Allow me to begin by saying that I hold immense respect for The Economist, its well-researched content, and data-driven conclusions. I was surprised, however, to see an almost categorical dismissal of online voting in your article last month, Why voting online is not the way to hold an election in a pandemic.

Whether we like it or not, technology has permeated our lives in undeniable ways, including our vote by mail system (like online absentee requests, voter registration, and electoral rolls). According to Pew Research, an outstanding 75% of adults across the world’s advanced economies own a smartphone, and most of us perform critical work through our mobile devices (including consuming this article).

Without our devices, we have no essential services—banking, telemedicine, news, video conferencing, online faith services, and social interactions—especially in the midst of a pandemic.

Computer science academics who argue that “no electronic system can be fully immune to cyber-attacks and technical issues” are missing the inclusion of key technological advances in their findings: fingerprint and facial authentication, the immutability of a digital signature, cryptography, and the decades-long work championed by Bill Gates and others in the field of trustworthy computing. Remarkably, these advances are all now embedded within our current-generation smartphones and can be leveraged to secure our ability to vote remotely. These arguments against online voting also overlook the very real imperfections of the current system, and its lack of resilience—during the U.S. 2018 midterm elections, for example, nearly half a million mail-in ballots were not counted, and many of those voters were not informed.

These arguments rob our critical infrastructure of the nuance demanded for consideration, and they keep our country locked in the past, actively shutting out citizens from participation. They also ignore the multiple, successful pilots that began in 2018 to enable deployed military, overseas citizens, and voters with disabilities to vote more easily and securely from the safety of their mobile devices. 

If we can agree that online voting is someday inevitable, how will we get there without the support of pilots and testing? 

This pandemic has revealed, in plain sight, the glaring flaws in our current voting systems. They are not resilient. There is no room for contingencies or disruptions. In a COVID-19 world, we must consider all methods to secure access to the vote—and this includes safe and auditable ways to conduct voting online. 

The time for piloting and testing is now. I will champion any initiative that works in tandem with local officials to ensure the security and integrity of each vote. With all due respect, however, shutting down the conversation is not the way to get ready for voting during this pandemic—or even the next. 

Sincerely,

Nimit Sawhney
Co-Founder and CEO, Voatz